CMoG to make waves with GlassBarge

Here at The Corning Museum of Glass, our mission is to tell the world about an incredible material that captivates and excites us all—namely, glass! In order to fulfill that mission, we don’t wait for the world to come to us—although 460,000 visitors made their way to Corning last year—we take our story out into the world.

The Corning Museum of Glass Road Show in Seattle, Wash.

The Corning Museum of Glass Road Show in Seattle, Wash.

In 2002, we launched the Hot Glass Roadshow, a project that converted a semi-trailer into a fully-functioning glassmaking studio on wheels. We also transformed a standard shipping container into a studio space. This unique equipment and its small footprint make it possible for CMoG to deploy glassmaking to nearly any environment. Our first deployment was the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City and, since then, our mobile hot shops have traveled the world stopping in places like Paris, Seattle, South Australia, and New York City. We’ve even circumnavigated the globe aboard Celebrity Cruises, a partnership that began in 2008, and one that enables us to tell the story of glass at sea. Read more →

The view from inside the furnace

View from inside the reheating furnace during a Hot Glass Show Demonstration.

View from inside the reheating furnace during a Hot Glass
Show Demonstration.

Hot Glass Demonstrations at The Corning Museum of Glass offer a unique view of glassmaking that cannot be seen anywhere else—inside the furnace.

So, how did we put a camera inside the furnace? The history begins with Steuben, where the factory floor, adjacent to the Museum, was an inspiration in the development of the Museum’s own Hot Glass Demonstrations. A former designer for Steuben and now the Museum’s senior director of creative services and marketing, Robert Cassetti, proposed the idea for a camera view of inside the reheating furnace after walking on the production floor of the Steuben factory. The reheating chambers that the gaffers worked at while creating pieces of Steuben’s lead crystal art were large furnaces with several openings around all sides, so multiple people could work from the same furnace at once. If two gaffers were working on opposite sides of the furnace, there were moments when you could look directly through the hole on one side and see the piece being made at the opposite side. Read more →

Investigations inside the box: Flabellina trilineata

Flameworker Jen Kuhn with her Flabellina trilineata box.

Flameworker Jen Kuhn with her Flabellina
trilineata box.


Flameworker Jen Kuhn remembers the moment she discovered the sea slug. “I was browsing a copy of Susan Middleton’s book Spineless and was captivated by the nudibranch [sea slug] on page 24,” said Jen. Though Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka never made this specific animal, Flabellina trilineata, Jen thought it looked like something she could make but that would still challenge her skills as an artist, having made glass beads and animal sculptures for eight years. Read more →

The land of waterfalls

taryn_04Norway’s beauty is unparalleled. The Hot Glass Demo at Sea on the Celebrity Eclipse visited several Norwegian ports where travelers could explore city life at places such as Stavanger, Ålesund, and Bergen, while other ports, like Geiranger and Flåm, brought you straight to nature’s doorstep. Our Hot Glass Team took every opportunity we could to get lost in these amazing landscapes (okay, not literally).

Geiranger has a quaint town center with a magnificent waterfall, just a short, accessible walk down the road. You don’t have to travel far to see this powerful body of water or feel its icy mist. However, stemming from this point are many trails through the mossy green forests, working their way up to greater sights and expansive views. Just past the visitor center of this World Heritage site, we found a trail map that set us on the right path with the time we had. We decided to set out for Storsæterfossen, a waterfall that had a foot path build into the rock underneath it. The hike up was moderate but long, as most of it was on the road to reach the actual trailhead. Walking underneath this massive waterfall, you never knew you could feel so alive. It was stunning! Despite the cold, the dampness, and the hour-long downpour as we headed back down to sea level, the adventure well out-weighed the wet Norwegian weather! Read more →

CMoG to make waves with GlassBarge

Here at The Corning Museum of Glass, our mission is to tell the world about an incredible material that captivates and excites us all—namely, glass! In order to fulfill that mission, we don’t wait for the world to come to us—although 460,000 visitors made their way to Corning last year—we take our story out into the world.

The Corning Museum of Glass Road Show in Seattle, Wash.

The Corning Museum of Glass Road Show in Seattle, Wash.

In 2002, we launched the Hot Glass Roadshow, a project that converted a semi-trailer into a fully-functioning glassmaking studio on wheels. We also transformed a standard shipping container into a studio space. This unique equipment and its small footprint make it possible for CMoG to deploy glassmaking to nearly any environment. Our first deployment was the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City and, since then, our mobile hot shops have traveled the world stopping in places like Paris, Seattle, South Australia, and New York City. We’ve even circumnavigated the globe aboard Celebrity Cruises, a partnership that began in 2008, and one that enables us to tell the story of glass at sea. Read more →

Corning Museum of Glass Unveils 2016 Rakow Commission by Thaddeus Wolfe

Stacked Grid Structure by Thaddeus Wolfe

Stacked Grid Structure
Thaddeus Wolfe (American, born 1979)
Made in United States, Brooklyn, New York, 2016
Mold-blown glass with brass inclusions
2016.4.9, 31st Rakow Commission

The Corning Museum of Glass unveiled Stacked Grid Structure, this year’s Rakow Commission by Brooklyn-based American artist Thaddeus Wolfe.

Wolfe creates multi-layered, highly-textured, angular mold-blown vessels, sculptures, and lighting fixtures. Stacked Grid Structure, like Wolfe’s other objects, was made by blowing glass into a one-time-use plaster silica mold cast over a carved Styrofoam positive. Creating his molds in this way enables Wolfe to force the material into structures that are at odds with the fluid nature of molten glass.

Stacked Grid Structure is the perfect artifact of its time,” said Susie Silbert, curator of modern and contemporary glass. “A bold and inventively made object, it bridges craft, design, and art in its production, conception, and ambition, exemplifying the blurred boundaries that make contemporary glass such an exciting field today.” Read more →

Ennion Society acquires 14 English scent bottles for the Museum

The Woodall team working on The Great Tazza and a two-handed vase, 1891

The Woodall Team working on the Great Tazza and a
two-handled vase Amblecote, England, 1891. CMGL 97796.

An exquisite collection of late 19th-century English scent bottles are the most recent gift to The Corning Museum of Glass from the Ennion Society, the Museum’s patron group. The 14 bottles represent a wide variety of cameo glass styles produced by Thomas Webb and Sons, a prolific and innovative glass house based in Amblecote, England. This collection of bottles demonstrates the variety of techniques used in the production of carved cameo glass, from the simple to the spectacular. Work by artists and engravers Jules Barbe, Harry A. Davies, and Fridolin Kretschman, who worked under the supervision of brothers Thomas and George Woodall, is included. Read more →