Recent Acquisition: Sketches by Leslie H. Nash

These recent acquisitions are works by Leslie H. Nash (1884–1958), best known in connection with Louis Comfort Tiffany, who employed both Leslie and his father for many years.

Drawing for Two Aquamarine Vases

Drawing for Two Aquamarine Vases

Drawing for Two Aquamarine Vases

This watercolor and pencil drawing is a design for two Aquamarine vases, the last major Favrile glass product developed by Tiffany Studios and introduced around 1911. Leslie Nash played a crucial role in its design and production. Both types of Aquamarine glass are represented in the drawing: the vase on the left depicts water lilies, while the vase on the right shows fish and seaweed.

You may already know that the Museum owns a piece of Aquamarine glass – the Favrile Aquamarine Paperweight Vase with Sea Life (54.4.6) which is currently on display.

Aquamarine Favrile glass, Leslie Hayden Nash. 1911–1912. Bib ID 132147, 1 art original: watercolor and pencil on paper; 28 x 22 cm.

View full object record: http://www.cmog.org/library/aquamarine-favrile-glass-art-original

Sketch of Corona Lab

Sketch of Corona Lab

Sketch of Corona Lab

The later pencil sketch shows the “Louis C. Tiffany Furnaces,” located in Corona (Queens), New York. It is signed by Nash and dated 1926, a few years before the stock market crash and the closure of Tiffany Studios. Penciled below the sketch, Nash wrote:

A sketch of the Lab where I spent many lonely hours. The home of (FAVRILE) glass. This was the experimental end of the Lab. The other end was used for regular everyday fillings (much larger) A silk thread stretched the floor to the electric clock in my office would warn me that someone was in the Lab.

Sketch of Tiffany Furnaces in Corona, Leslie Hayden Nash. 1926. Bib ID 132148, 1 art original: pencil on paper; 27 x 30 cm.

View full object record: http://www.cmog.org/library/sketch-tiffany-furnaces-corona-art-original

2 comments
Aprille, Associate Librarian for Public Services
Aprille, Associate Librarian for Public Services 5pts

Favrile glass is a type of glass with an iridescent surface, patented by Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933) in 1894. A search of Museum collections (http://www.cmog.org/collection/search) for favrile reveals 79 items that will give you an idea of the breadth of shapes used. In 2010 the Museum put on an exhibition of favrile glass, Tiffany Treasures: Favrile Glass from Special Collections that featured nearly 60 pieces http://www.cmog.org/article/tiffany-treasures-favrile-glass-special-collections. The exhibition included a stunning, highly unusual Tiffany Peacock blown-glass lamp. The lamp was donated to the Corning Museum fully shattered, but has now returned to its full glory after a painstaking three-month restoration process by Museum conservators http://www.cmog.org/article/restoring-tiffany. Please contact the Library at http://libanswers.cmog.org/ for more in-depth information.

Patrick
Patrick 5pts

Great post. I always thought of Faverile glass as featuring an overall iridescence. It's interesting to know that other styles of glass were made. Can you elaborate on the range and styles of Faverile Glass?