Donà Tools giveaway honors the legacy of Elio Quarisa

Elio Quarisa Elio Quarisa was a beloved Italian maestro and instructor who taught at The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass for many years, as well as in other studios and glass schools throughout the country. He loved to share Venetian glassworking techniques with the world, and his impact on the lives of many glass artists is undeniable.  After his death in 2010, The Studio, along with close friends of Elio’s, set up a scholarship fund in Elio’s name to continue to support the passion he instilled in his students. To further carry on his memory, Roberto Donà, toolmaker and owner of Carlo Donà, has donated 14 glassblowing tools to The Studio to be given to an artist who is passionate about Venetian glassblowing.

Those who knew him personally share fond memories of him as a man with a kind heart and an aptitude for teaching. “Elio’s greatest lesson for me – Whatever you bring into the shop will manifest itself in your glass. If you approach your work with passion, humility and respect, great things will happen,” writes Eric Meek, Hot Glass Show supervisor at the Museum.

For the giveaway, artists are asked to submit a statement about how they were influenced by Elio, as well as images of their own work. We’ve set up a page displaying the images and statements submitted in memory of Elio. You can see them at www.cmog.org/remembering-elio.

Roberto Dona and Elio Quarisa

Roberto Dona and Elio Quarisa

The giveaway will provide the winner with the tools necessary to keep this type of glassworking flourishing.

To participate, visit www.cmog.org/remembering-elio. The giveaway is open to artists who have studied under Elio, as well as artists who have a passion for Venetian style glassblowing, to which he dedicated his life. The deadline for submissions is this Saturday, December 1.

1 comments
Cassandra Rothman
Cassandra Rothman 5pts

This is a very good tribute. Elio Quarisa started working very young up to the time that he was given the title of reaching the level of Primo Maestro (Italian for “First Master”). He has a great passion for glass works and was very kind to teach the younger generations of his talent.