North Wing Tour with Safety Manager Charles Ackerman

Charles Ackerman, the Senior Project Manager for Safety, at Welliver, the Contractor for the North Wing expansion project, was kind enough to allow me to tag along while he took one of his three daily safety inspections.

Charles Ackerman, Senior Project Manager at Welliver

Charles Ackerman, Senior Project Manager at Welliver

He explained some of the safety procedures and concerns as we walked through the site.  One thing I noticed immediately is that the job site looks safe.  Everything is neat and orderly.  The floor is swept.  There are no trip hazards.  Nothing looks as though it will fall from above.  Debris is piled in separate piles, cement blocks with cement blocks; insulation with insulation for example.  Yellow tape across an area means “Proceed with Caution.”  Red Tape means “Do Not Proceed.”

It is a bit eerie to look at the empty Museum office spaces where so much activity was going on just a year ago. The spaces look smaller than they did when they were fully occupied. Here are some pictures:

Behind North Wing

Behind North Wing

North Museum Offices

North Museum Offices

Charles told me that more items are going to be recycled than you might expect. All steel, iron and copper pipes will be recycled. All wire will be recycled. All other metals get recycled including metal studs, ceiling grids, handrails, I beams and rebar. Old ceiling tiles will be ground up for insulation. Sheetrock is used in sanitary landfills. Concrete will be ground up and used again in new concrete.
Here are a few more pictures:

Danger zone

Danger zone

Red tape prevents anyone from walking where bricks are being thrown from above.  The bricks are sprayed with water to suppress the dust.

Yellow tape indicates Caution

Yellow tape indicates Caution

 

Demolition in Progress

Demolition in Progress

 

More demolition

More demolition

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John Cowden works with special projects at The Corning Museum of Glass and supported the Hot Glass Show Innovation theater construction project in his retirement. Cowden was a supervisor and narrator at the Hot Glass Show from 1999 to 2011. Before joining the Museum, Cowden had more than 10 years of experience in the field of glassworking, primarily using cold working techniques, processes such as slumping, making molds, grinding, and polishing, where time is not a pressure.