Celebrating The Studio: Amy Schwartz

This week marks the 20th anniversary of the opening of The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass, one of the foremost teaching schools for glass in the world. To celebrate, we have been featuring 20 artists in the 20 weeks leading up to the birthday. These artists have studied, taught, and created at The Studio. For a complete list of birthday festivities on Thursday, May 26, visit The Studio at 20

Today, we share a message from The Studio’s director, Amy Schwartz. 

In 1995, my husband Bill Gudenrath and I moved to Corning, NY, to design, build, program, and lead The Studio. Twenty years later, we are still at it—and it has been a wonderful journey!


Read more →

Collecting Contemporary Artist Archives

If you are an artist working in glass interested in donating materials that document your life and career, we will be collecting items for our artists’ file at the Rakow Library during the Glass Art Society (GAS) conference, June 9-11. You can also stop by to talk with our archivists about your archives and how best to preserve them at our Ask an Archivist table in the Rakow Library on June 8, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm, and June 10, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm.

The Rakow Research Library is home to the sketchbooks, photographs, letters, videos, design drawings, journals, and other papers of artists from around the world. The personal archives of these artists are important not only because each reveals the history of an artist, but also because they offer background and context to that artist’s work.

Harvey Littleton at the furnace, [1975-1985?], Spruce Pine, NC, Marvin Lipofsky photograph collection, CMGL 150776.

Harvey Littleton at the furnace, [1975-1985?], Spruce Pine, NC, Marvin Lipofsky photograph collection, CMGL 150776.

  Read more →

Celebrating The Studio: Lino Tagliapietra

Lino Tagliapietra

Lino Tagliapietra is recognized the world over as a master of traditional techniques, a teacher who has shaped the world of contemporary glass, and an artist who creates sculptures renowned for their complexity, elegance, and visual poetry. Tagliapietra, who is a Fellow of the Museum, has played a major role in introducing Venetian glassworking techniques in the Far East, Australia, Europe, and North and South America. He has collaborated with many artists, and he has inspired many more. His work is widely exhibited in museums and galleries around the world.

Lino Tagliapietra with Paul Stankard and Jiří Harcuba at The Studio.

Lino Tagliapietra with Paul Stankard and
Jiří Harcuba at The Studio.

Read more →

Blaschka Glass Marine Creatures Exhibition Opens May 14, 2016

Specimen of Blaschka Marine Life: Ulactis muscosa (Nr. 116), Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka, Dresden, Germany, 1885. Lent by Cornell University, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. L.17.3.63-54.

This May, The Corning Museum of Glass will present Fragile Legacy: The Marine Invertebrate Glass Models of Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka, an exhibition featuring nearly 70 exquisitely detailed glass models of marine invertebrates made by the legendary father-and-son team. Created as scientific teaching aids in the late 19th century, the models capture the diversity and splendor of aquatic life more than 100 years ago. Read more →

Revealing the Mysteries of Venetian Glassmaking Techniques through new Online Resource

This morning, The Corning Museum of Glass released its first-ever scholarly electronic resource, The Techniques of Renaissance Venetian Glassworking by artist and scholar, William Gudenrath. A culmination of a lifetime of research, this digital resource details the techniques used to make glass on Murano, Venice’s historic glassmaking island, between about 1500 and 1700, a period known as “the golden age of Venetian glass.” Through 360˚ photography and high-definition video, complete reconstructions of Venetian glassmaking techniques unknown for centuries are now revealed.

Dragon-Stem Goblet, Venice, Italy, 1630-1670. 51.3.118.

Detail of Dragon-Stem Goblet, Venice, Italy, 1630-1670. 51.3.118.

Read more →

The Batchshed Project: Exploring Indigenous Glass

This post comes from Dr. Glen Cook, chief scientist at The Corning Museum of Glass.

Professor Fred Herbst stokes wood into the firebox of one of Corning Community College’s wood-fired kilns. These well-drafted kilns can achieve temperatures in excess of 2200°F.

Professor Fred Herbst stokes wood into the firebox of one of Corning Community College’s wood-fired kilns. These well-drafted kilns can achieve temperatures in excess of 2200°F.

You may be familiar with words that have been created to designate the area from which a specific raw material is derived, such as watershed—the runoff land that feeds into a river system or lake. Other terms recently coined refer to other fundamental resources that are local to an area, like foodshed, and fibershed. I’ve coined the term “Batchshed” to describe the raw glass-making ingredients that come from a specific locale, that come together in the fire of locally harvested wood, to make “indigenous glass.” Read more →