The glass cat lady

Catherine Labonté has been working in glass for 17 years and, though her mastery of the craft has progressed, one thing remains the same: cats!

Catherine Labonté and her cat Bayou.

Catherine Labonté and her cat Bayou.

At home in Montréal, Canada, Catherine coldworks, kilncasts and flameworks in her own studio, Le Chat des Artistes (The Artists Cat), but her furnace time is spent at nearby Welmo Glass Studio. Cats are obviously a theme throughout her work, from her nickname to her studio space to her favorite animal, the cat is ever present. Read more →

Connecting Paper and Glass, Part 2: Whitefriars Stained Glass in New York City

This post comes from Laura Hashimoto and Bonnie Hodul, Rakow Research Library interns working on the conservation of the Whitefriars stained glass cartoon collection over the summer, in conjunction with West Lake Conservators. Read more about this project and the collection in previous posts.

Read Connecting Paper and Glass, Part 1.

After our visit to Calvary Church in Summit, New Jersey, we headed into Manhattan to see Temple Emanu-El, for which we treated two paper cartoons. Walking into this synagogue was astounding; the building is one of the largest synagogues in the world. Right away we noticed that some of the windows, which were as high up as they possibly could be in the vast space, matched our cartoons.

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Telescope Quest: Day 19

Marvin Bolt, the Museum’s curator of science and technology, traveled to Europe last fall to research some of the world’s oldest telescopes. Read along to hear about his adventures and discoveries.

Heinrich Stolle telescope at the British Museum.

Heinrich Stolle telescope at the British Museum.

The British Museum (in London, England) houses countless artifacts from around the world. One of the best entries into its holdings is the book (and podcast) A History of the World in 100 Objects. One of the examples that didn’t make the cut nonetheless drew us into the museum for an entire day.

This small telescope (right) was made by Heinrich Stolle, a clockmaker in Prague who died in 1627. Read more →

Thaddeus Wolfe Named 2016 Rakow Commission Artist

The Corning Museum of Glass has named Thaddeus Wolfe, a Brooklyn-based American artist known for colorful, multi-layered, highly-textured mold-blown vessels, as the recipient of the Rakow Commission in 2016.

Thaddeus Wolfe, Image by Joe Kramm, Courtesy of R & Company.

Thaddeus Wolfe, Image by Joe Kramm,
Courtesy of R & Company.

Situated at the nexus between art, design, and craft, Wolfe’s objects are refined explorations of the possibilities and applications of mold-blown glass, a technique with origins in ancient Rome. Employing new materials and aesthetics, Wolfe mines this ancient technique to create objects that appear futuristic and otherworldly.

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Blaschka Glass Marine Creatures Exhibition Opens May 14, 2016

Specimen of Blaschka Marine Life: Ulactis muscosa (Nr. 116), Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka, Dresden, Germany, 1885. Lent by Cornell University, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. L.17.3.63-54.

This May, The Corning Museum of Glass will present Fragile Legacy: The Marine Invertebrate Glass Models of Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka, an exhibition featuring nearly 70 exquisitely detailed glass models of marine invertebrates made by the legendary father-and-son team. Created as scientific teaching aids in the late 19th century, the models capture the diversity and splendor of aquatic life more than 100 years ago. Read more →

Revealing the Mysteries of Venetian Glassmaking Techniques through new Online Resource

This morning, The Corning Museum of Glass released its first-ever scholarly electronic resource, The Techniques of Renaissance Venetian Glassworking by artist and scholar, William Gudenrath. A culmination of a lifetime of research, this digital resource details the techniques used to make glass on Murano, Venice’s historic glassmaking island, between about 1500 and 1700, a period known as “the golden age of Venetian glass.” Through 360˚ photography and high-definition video, complete reconstructions of Venetian glassmaking techniques unknown for centuries are now revealed.

Dragon-Stem Goblet, Venice, Italy, 1630-1670. 51.3.118.

Detail of Dragon-Stem Goblet, Venice, Italy, 1630-1670. 51.3.118.

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The Batchshed Project: Exploring Indigenous Glass

This post comes from Dr. Glen Cook, chief scientist at The Corning Museum of Glass.

Professor Fred Herbst stokes wood into the firebox of one of Corning Community College’s wood-fired kilns. These well-drafted kilns can achieve temperatures in excess of 2200°F.

Professor Fred Herbst stokes wood into the firebox of one of Corning Community College’s wood-fired kilns. These well-drafted kilns can achieve temperatures in excess of 2200°F.

You may be familiar with words that have been created to designate the area from which a specific raw material is derived, such as watershed—the runoff land that feeds into a river system or lake. Other terms recently coined refer to other fundamental resources that are local to an area, like foodshed, and fibershed. I’ve coined the term “Batchshed” to describe the raw glass-making ingredients that come from a specific locale, that come together in the fire of locally harvested wood, to make “indigenous glass.” Read more →